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in japan are playing catch up. their technology wasn't able to help after the 2011 accident. but they've been fine tuning their inventions to make them better able to deal with challenges inside the damaged nuclear plant. >> reporter: it will take at least 30 years to decommission the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. there's a lot of work to be done. radiation levels are too high for workers to be inside for long. and that's where the robots come in. the first one inside was made in the u.s. it was used to collect data on physical damage and radiation. japanese robot developers felt they'd been beaten to the punch and they wanted to do more. >> translator: there were no japanese robots in there. people were wondering what our robots were even for so we were determined to make a difference no matter how small. >> reporter: the team was tasked with reimagining a domestic robot for use inside the plant. the quinn was a rescue robot designed to operate in disaster zones like collapsed buildings. its body was covered in treads that enabled it to climb through rubble and up steep stai
, but the profits went down because s.a.p. had to do some big investments, buying new technology, and investors have been very disappointed. shares are down by more than 12% on the frankfurt floor, but also the market is down in general. the dax loses 1% at the moment. the euro stoxx 50 is down by 0.75%, waiting for wall street, opening up significantly lower, and the dollar -- the euro is also significantly down. and at air berlin is to cut 900 jobs in the next two years. that is one in 10 of its workers, but it has not said which jobs will be going. >> berlin has been making a loss for years, and the job cuts are part of a plan to save 400 million euros. berlin says it wants to focus on its most profitable routes in germany, switzerland, and austria. during the cold war, germany's bundesbank took a bet by soaring gold reserves around the world and left in there after the collapse of communism. >> last year, official auditors point out that official stockpiles abroad have never actually been counted. >> plans are afoot to bring the bars back home, or at least some of them. >> at least he knows what
japan has a lot of expertise in renewable energies. >> translator: japan has advanced technology which should be put to good use. there are also business opportunities. not only the private sector but the government has to be involved with strengthening ties with the uae. >> reporter: another leading oil producer saudi arabia is facing a similar situation. a group last year released a report that says that the gulf nation could become an all important country by 2030. >>> weavers in kyoto have passed down their techniques for more than 500 years. but fashions have changed and fewer people are buying their textiles. so some craftsmen are trying out some radical new approaches. >> reporter: making the cloth is an intricate process. the finished weave is a work of art with colored threads including gold or silver. in the last ten years, however, the number of workshops has halved. so some weavers are shipping to products other than traditional kimono. weaving the high-tech material cotton fiber is also used in airplanes. carbon fiber is extremely light and strong, but it can also be britt
an incline of 27 degrees. it takes 90 seconds to reach the top. it is a technological wonder that we take for granted. in its 120-year lifetime, the escalator has helped to make life easier and people lazier. early escalators were little more than a conveyor belt without steps. some even had saddles for the users to sit on. the escalator truly came of age with the construction of subway systems. passengers were ferried up and down the underground. soon department stores were replacing elegant staircases with their moving counterparts. now escalators have melted seamlessly into the background of modern life. a giant outdoor escalator has even been installed in colombia. the only drawback is they are prone to breakdowns, and then it is a case of back to the stairs. still, if this one is anything to go by, the escalator at 120 is still capable of scaling new heights. >> before we go, we do just have time to recap of our top story -- the hostage crisis in algeria. several foreign hostages held at the internationally operating gas plant in algeria have reportedly been killed when the algerian
's long range missile technology. china has traditionally defended the north at the security council. >>> south korean intelligence agents have arrested a man they believe is a spy. n they believe the man passed confidential information. public broadcaster, kbs, reports the suspect was working at the seoul city office. he visited their homes and consulted with them over the phone. the report says the man they have linked information on 40% of the defactos in south korea. agents are investigating whether he was spying for the north every since. >>> thousands of people waiting to go home. tons of debris waiting for disposal. vast tracts of lands waiting to be restored. overcoming the disaster won't be easy. but step by step, people are moving forward. find out how on the road ahead. every wednesday at 1:00 p.m. japan time right here on "news line." >>> japan's nuclear regulators have been wondering how to save the nuclear power that crippled fukushima. they've drafted new standards. authority officials are preparing new filter vents for the plants. the vents would reduce pressure in th
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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